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Sandwich of the Week: Hannah’s Bretzel’s Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon Sandwich

Sandwich of the Week: Hannah’s Bretzel’s Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon Sandwich


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This sandwich packs a lot of flavor into a healthy package

The best kinds of sandwiches are the ones that are so tasty that you don’t even realize how healthy they are. Chicago sandwich shop Hannah’s Bretzel has made it their mission to provide their customers with just that.

The renowned Chicago eatery takes pride in its mission to use organic and all-natural ingredients in all of their dishes. They call themselves the "Über Sandwich Makers" in order to enforce their slogan and purpose: to have extremely tasty and healthy food while trying not to leave a large carbon footprint on the environment.

That brings us to the sandwich of the week: their wild smoked Alaskan salmon sandwich. Served on a "bretzel" baguette (the German word for, you guessed, it pretzel,” this sandwich is simple, smoky, and fresh with wild Alaskan smoked salmon, vine-ripened tomatoes, red onions, sliced cucumbers, and dill crème fraîche. To top it all off, this delicious lunch combination contains only 450 calories.

You’re probably thinking, "How does this sandwich only have 450 calories when it is served on a pretzel roll?" Well, the answer is that Hannah’s bretzel rolls are made with organic whole-grain flour and butter instead of the classic pretzel recipe, which uses white flour and lard. The rest of the ingredients are strategically compiled to enhance the overall cool, refreshing taste of this sandwich. The airy yet sharply aromatic dill crème fraîche is the perfect spread to tie in the tomatoes, red onions, and sliced cucumbers with the smoky taste of the wild Alaskan salmon.

The best news about this sandwich is that you can eat it without feeling bad about your body or the environment, so there is absolutely no reason to pass up this guilt-free and delicious dining experience.

Skyler Bouchard is a junior writer at the Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter at @skylerbouchard.

Click here for other featured sandwiches or check out the 2012 Year in Sandwiches and the Sandwich of the Week Slideshow. Know a sandwich that should be featured? Email The Daily Meal or comment below. Better yet, become a contributor and write up your favorite today!


Does Smoked Salmon Go Bad?

So smoked salmon was on sale, and you decided to stock up. You bought a few more packages than you can use in the next week or two, so you start to wonder: does smoked salmon go bad?

Or maybe you’ve bought smoked salmon for the first time, and you wonder how long you can store the leftovers or if you can freeze the fish.

In this article, we go through storage, shelf life, and going bad of smoked salmon. If you’re interested in learning more about these topics, this article is for you.

Smoked salmon package

Best Pouched: SeaBear Ready to Eat Wild Sockeye Salmon in Pouch, 3.5-Ounce

100 percent wild sockeye salmon

Great for camping or on the go

Pouch holds less volume than a can

Silver retort pouches are gaining in popularity for shipping shelf-stable cooked fish. They are lighter than cans, which make them convenient for emergency kits, hiking, or picnics where their portability and easy opening would be valuable. Unopened pouches last without refrigeration at least four years, according to the manufacturer. SeaBear offers bulk purchasing of pouches, too.

SeaBear has been operating in its own smokehouse and cannery in Anacortes, WA, since 1957. The sockeye is premium quality and 100 percent wild, but note that SeaBear buys fish from other sources in the Pacific Northwest than Alaska, likely Puget Sound near its facility.

It is packed without skin and bones, lightly flaked, and flavored with only a bit of sea salt. The fish is cooked in its own juices in the pouch, then vacuum-sealed. At 3.5 ounces, the pouches hold considerably less volume than a traditional can, which equates to roughly a single serving portion.


Sandwich of the Week: Hannah’s Bretzel’s Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon Sandwich - Recipes

does an ice cream sandwich count?

hell, i would. but eff Chipwich. like x 1000.

If I am at home and making my own bag lunch I will make the following:

Salami
Mild Cheddar Cheese
Challah Bread!

My favorite sandwich to make at home for dinner or to get at a restaurant (Because it has to be hot!) Has to be a Cuban.

The perfect Cuban Sandwich:

Pork
Salami
Ham
Swiss Cheese
Mustard
Pickles, Thin, sliced long ways.
All perfectly pressed on Freshly Baked Cuban Bread!

Being a native of Tampa Bay, I took them for granted. Most people in the North part of the state had never heard of such a sandwich! Which sucked during my college years! I fondly remember a time one of my sorority sisters (Also a Tampa native) and me had a craving for a Cuban Sandwich, so we taught the Sub guy at Publix how to make one. lol!

can we do breakfast sandwiches too?

im a fan of egg bacon and cheddar on a crossaint. toasted only on the inside, cause then the outside gets all flaky and i dont appreciate that.

oh wait, one more, because i rarely meet a sandwich i dont like.

turkey, green apple slices and brie on a baguette. yum.

My number one favorite is salami and cheddar on wheat. I like mine with Italian vinaigrette (oil and vinegar in a pinch), a little Tabasco, tomato, and dill pickle. They're good made with the bread toasted (like. just the bread) or heated up, though they're greasier hot.

I also love Reubens--Corned beef, sauerkraut, and swiss on rye, with thousand island dressing, grilled. I like mine with LOTS of sauerkraut (and a little Tabasco, 'cause it's like CRACK.)

My perfect burger is medium rare, ketchup, mustard, tomato, sweet onion, dill pickle (or sweet-pickled banana wax peppers that my daddy makes), on a waaarm bun. Y'all are going to make fun of me, but I put onion dip on my burgers if it's around. MMMM. Cheddar and bacon never hurt, either. I also like 'em with bleu cheese in the middle. You take two thiiiin patties, put a bit of bleu cheese in the center of one, put the other on top, and press the edges together. if you do it that way, sauteed mushrooms on top are the way to go.

can we do breakfast sandwiches too?

im a fan of egg bacon and cheddar on a crossaint. toasted only on the inside, cause then the outside gets all flaky and i dont appreciate that.

Back when I lived in Houston there was a deli in my office building that made just what you are talking about with very sharp cheddar. That rocked! They toasted the croissant open faced on the grill which kept the outside from drying out.

Tippiechick- sundried tomato chicken sounds awesome. How do you make that? Or is it a deli meat?

OTW- good call on the holiday leftovers. Plain Thanksgiving turkey with mustard on croissants is another one I like. Never tried it with gravy- but does sound good.

Good stuff overall. I have a selfish reason for this thread- I am looking for some other good healthy sandwich ideas to add to the mix, and lots of good ones so far.

The best breakfast sandwich I've ever had was at this coffee shop back home.

Big croissant bread, two or three sausage patties, eggs sunny side up, with cream cheese and honey on the bread. It would fatten you up right quick.


How to tell if Salmon is bad, rotten or spoiled?

Practicing proper hygiene and food safety techniques will help prevent foodborne illness.

Although not a perfect test, your senses are usually the most reliable instruments to tell if your salmon has gone bad. Some common traits of bad salmon are a slimy, milky flesh (a thick, slippery coating) and a fishy smell. Although this is tricky because it is smelly and slimy by nature, these traits become more pronounced when salmon has gone bad and just opening the package of spoiled fish should alert your nose right away that something is wrong.

There are, of course, certain health risks associated with spoiled foods so always remember to practice food safety and enjoy your foods before their shelf life has expired!


Alaskan Wild Caught Smoked Sockeye Salmon - 2 Jars

Sue & Israel Shotridge now offer the best of Alaskan Wild Caught Salmon from the glacier fed waters of Alaska. This makes a great gift for anyone who loves smoked fish, and is an excellent idea to keep for yourself. Stock your cupboard or pantry and enjoy the great taste of Wild Caught Alaska Seafood year-round. Our Smoked Salmon in a Premium Glass Jar is shelf-stable and requires no refrigeration until opened. Additionally, they go great in a variety of recipes, or straight out of the jar.

Packed in 6.5 oz home-style jars.

The Northwest Salmon design that brands our Smoked Sockeye Salmon was created by Tlingit Artist Israel Shotridge. This design depicts the Northwest Salmon and it’s importance in how it plays an integral part in the life of the indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest. For many Northwest tribes Salmon provides the nutritional value that is needed for a healthy life.

Honored and celebrated by all coastal peoples, the Salmon serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance

Our salmon is traditional, hand packed, smoked sockeye from Jarred Alaskan Smoked Sockeye Salmon. We offer only wild-caught and sustainable Alaskan Seafood. Because Salmon swim freely in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Southeast Alaska, and the waters of the North Pacific Ocean, this habitat creates seafood with a lean and firm texture, which provides a superior flavor.


Alaskan Wild Caught Smoked Sockeye Salmon - 12 Jar Box with Glass Cutting Board

Редкая находка! Этот товар не так просто найти.

Доступна подарочная упаковка

Материалы: Salmon, Brown Sugar

Read the full description

12 Jars of Smoked Sockeye Salmon and Large 'Salmon Run' Glass Cutting Board

Sue & Israel Shotridge now offer the best of Alaskan Wild Caught Salmon from the glacier fed waters of Alaska. This makes a great gift for anyone who loves smoked fish, and is an excellent idea to keep for yourself. Stock your cupboard or pantry and enjoy the great taste of Wild Caught Alaska Seafood year-round. Our Smoked Salmon in a Premium Glass Jar is shelf-stable and requires no refrigeration until opened. Additionally, they go great in a variety of recipes, or straight out of the jar.

Packed in 6.5 oz home-style jars.

The original Northwest Salmon design that brands NW Indigenous Wellness’s Smoked Sockeye Salmon was created by Tlingit Artist Israel Shotridge. This design depicts the Northwest Salmon and it’s importance in how it plays an integral part in the life of the indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest. For many Northwest tribes Salmon provides the nutritional value that is needed for a healthy life.

Honored and celebrated by all coastal peoples, the Salmon serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance

Our salmon is traditional, hand packed, smoked sockeye from Jarred Alaskan Smoked Sockeye Salmon. We offer only wild-caught and sustainable Alaskan Seafood. Because Salmon swim freely in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Southeast Alaska, and the waters of the North Pacific Ocean, this habitat creates seafood with a lean and firm texture, which provides a superior flavor.


Should smoked salmon be an everyday food?

As a child I remember Christmas as the one time of the year we would eat lots of smoked salmon – a luxury food saved for a special time of year. But now we eat it all year round and it’s no longer special many kids grow up thinking a smoked salmon sandwich for lunch is the norm. But should smoked salmon be an everyday food – or are there any reasons why we should cut down on our intake?
Smoked salmon, smoked mackerel and kippers are good inclusions in the diet due to their Omega 3 content. But I have to admit that I’m lazy I don’t look at the back of the packet as I’m normally in a rush, so I often grab the mid-range salmon that’s on promotion (especially if I have the kids with me and I want to escape the supermarket quickly). This actually means I have zero clue as to how the salmon is smoked, or even how much salt and fat is in it.

Another nagging concern has been whether the smoking process negates the healthy Omega 3 benefits – is it really ok to eat it on an everyday basis or should it fall into the luxury ‘treat’ category? We constantly hear that smoked foods are bad for us. So what does this mean for smoked salmon – is it good or bad? I’m confused, let alone everyone else.

Smoking fish:

Smoking has been used for centuries for preserving red meats and fish for times when fresh food is short in supply. Salt (used for curing the fish first), and wood smoke (from pine, cherry, beech, birch, ash, oak, apple etc.) have antimicrobial properties – so the food lasts longer. Nowadays we use our fridges and freezers as preservation methods smoking is primarily to add flavour.

There are three main ways of smoking fish:

1. Cold Smoking – cured fish is smoked at a low temperature (20-30°C). The fish isn’t cooked by this method – it is purely for preservation and flavour, but retains a velvety texture.

2. Hot Smoking – cured fish is smoked at a higher temperature, (52-80°C), which cooks the fish, leaving it flakier and drier.

3. Liquid Smoking – sounds revolting but this is a cheaper way of giving fish a smoked flavour. Liquid smoke is basically liquid that has had smoke passed through it. It’s more commonly used on smoked fish to be cooked – smoked haddock or kippers for example. There’s no way of telling if your fish has been liquid smoked (unless it says otherwise) but the fish will be ‘wetter’ – curing or traditional smoking dries the fish out. I do feel a bit duped with this method – if I’m buying smoked fish I like the visual illusion of fish over wood chips rather than dunked in a bowl of liquid.

Smoked salmon concerns:

Salt content: there’s no getting around the fact that smoked salmon is a higher salt food. Cheaper smoked salmon may have been injected with a salt solution instead of wet (soaked in brine) or dry (packed in salt) curing – this results in a saltier, wetter and heavier salmon, often ‘balanced’ with the addition of sugar. However, even the saltiest 100 grams is still within the upper daily salt limit of 6g, so unless you’ve been told to follow a low salt diet, I’d recommend checking the packet (some brands are lower salt than others) and reduce any other obvious salt sources on the same day as eating smoked salmon.

Fat content: the total fat content of smoked salmon can be high, so if you’re worried about total fat and calories, but still want those important Omega 3s, choose wild smoked salmon, which has a total fat content one third that of farmed salmon.

Farmed salmon is fattier as stocks are reared in confined spaces where they don’t have much room to swim freely. Wild salmon are leaner – they swim hundreds of miles migrating to spawning areas.

However, if it’s total Omega 3 content you’re after, it’s farmed that has the higher level (you might be interested to read our ‘children’s behaviour and fish oil’ post). Also consider hot smoked salmon instead of cold smoked hot instead of cold smoking appears to give greater protection to the fragile Omega 3 fats.

Toxins: for Omega 3 intake, children or women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or looking to conceive should eat maximum one or two portions of oily fish a week (140 grams each) and men up to a maximum four portions. Larger fatty fish, such as fresh or smoked salmon, do accumulate more toxins. If you’re worried about toxins, start checking out the source of your salmon – organic farmed, or wild salmon from unpolluted waters should have lower levels so are the best to opt for.

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): cold or hot smoking (and liquid smoke) creates chemicals called PAHs – carcinogenic in high levels.

Commercial smoking is highly regulated to control maximum permitted PAHs. In fact PAHs from smoked salmon are tiny compared to the amount of PAHs produced by our own high temperature cooking at home, on barbecues or grills.

Listeria Risk: curing (e.g. gravlax) or cold smoking doesn’t cook fish, so the EU has stringent food safety guidelines (food hygiene, manufacturing processes, temperature control) to reduce the risk of listeria. Some producers use anti-listeria sprays or rinses (but are not required to disclose this) on their smoked salmon. In the EU the risk of listeria now from smoked salmon is so low it is now deemed safe even in pregnancy.

If you have any concerns about listeria, opt for hot smoked salmon instead. The heating, and cooking of the fish virtually reduces listeria risk.

Our conclusion? For most people, the we think the value of the Omega 3 content in smoked salmon outweighs the negatives – but it’s worth checking the back of the packet a little more: wild, organic farmed or hot smoked salmon seem to be the best options.

Remember that good producers of quality salmon want us to know where their salmon is from and how it is smoked, so they’ll tell us….

Manufacturer Total Fat Sat Fat Omega 3 Fat Salt
Tesco Finest Smoked Salmon 9.9g 2.6g 2g 2.8g
Tesco Finest Wild Alaskan 3.3g 1g n/a 3g
Tesco Hot Smoked Salmon 14.5g 2.5g n/a 1.8g
Waitrose Scottish Smoked Salmon 9.9g 2.7g n/a 3.13
Waitrose Wild Alaskan Smoked Salmon 2.7g 0.7g 0.4g 3.5g
Asda Hot Smoked Salmon Flakes 9.6g 2.3g 2.4 3.7g
Asda Smoked Scottish salmon 9.3g 1.6g 1.9g 2.3g
Sainsbury’s Scottish Mild Smoked Salmon 14g 2.9g 3.5g 4.25g
Sainsbury’s Wild Sockeye Smoked Salmon 3.2g 0.9g 0.5g 2.5g

We hope you enjoy this blog post, let us know your thoughts in the comments below or on social media – we’re on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. And don’t forget to sign up to our newsletter to receive a monthly update of our recipes, nutrition tips and expert advice.


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